Category Archives: Seminars and other events

Seminar 22 May 2017: Brexit and its impact on Asia & the Commonwealth

Lord Bruce, President of The Democracy Forum, 

Invites you to a seminar entitled

‘Brexit and its impact on Asia & the Commonwealth’

on 

Monday 22 May, from 15:00–17:30 UTC+01

 

Chair: 

Humphrey Hawksley, Former BBC Beijing Bureau Chief, author & columnist for Nikkei Asian Review

 

Speakers: 

Lord Desai, Economist & Labour politician

Linda Yueh, Broadcaster, author and economist

Richard Burge, Executive Director, Commonwealth Enterprise and Investment Council

John Elliott Journalist & author

 

Venue:

Senate Room, Senate House

Malet St

London WC1E 7HU

 

Please join us for post-seminar drinks and nibbles in the Jessel Room from 17:30 

Nearest tube stations: Russell Square, Goodge St, Warren St

 

RSVP:

thedemocracyforum@hotmail.co.uk

Tel: 020-7409-5113

www.facebook.com/democracyforum

https://twitter.com/thedemocracyltd


‘The many are more incorruptible than the few;

they are like the greater quantity of water which is less easily corrupted than a little.’

Aristotle, Politics

DESCENDANT OF BALOCHISTAN RULERS WANTS FREEDOM

Amir Ahmed Suleman Daud, whose ancestors ruled much of the Balochistan region, now a part of Pakistan, declared in London he will approach India for the independence of Balochistan. Daud is in exile in the United Kingdom.
Addressing a seminar entitled “Balochistan Re-visited” at the British Houses of Parliament organised by The Democracy Forum, Daud said: “I will go to India (to pursue independence for Balochistan).” In reference to Narendra Modi’s speech on 15 August last supporting Balochi separatism, he added: “I welcomed Mr Modi’s statement.”
Speaking to a packed house, he resolutely stated, in course of stormy exchanges with pro-Pakistan elements in the audience, he will go to Afghanistan, Iran and other countries. He disclosed he is actively in touch with Congress in the United States to achieve his goal.
He described Balochistan’s accession to Pakistan in 1948 as an “annexation”. He argued: “We lost our independence because of geo-politics.” He explained this by saying Britain wanted to deny the Soviet Union access to warm waters. “This is why they (the British) went back on the treaties (between the Kalat State and the UK).
In the centuries-old Kalat Confederacy (effectively Balochistan), the Khan of Kalat was the head, Daud maintained. The British leased various parts of the Kalat State. On 4 August 1947, Lord Mountbatten, the Viceroy of India, the Khan of Kalat and the founder of the in-coming state of Pakistan, Mohammed Ali Jinnah, signed an agreement in Delhi recognising the independence of Kalat for negotiation purposes. Kalat, in fact, remained independent until 28 March 1948, when it merged under duress with Pakistan.
Daud virtually accused Jinnah of treachery. He explained the latter was Kalat’s lawyer from 1933 to 1947. “He (Jinnah) pleaded our case with the (British) Privy Council,” Daud mentioned.
He went on to say the British “persuaded Jinnah to change his mind”. He concluded: “He (Jinnah) had inside information, which undermined us.”


The Democracy Forum is a non-profit-making organisation, founded in 2009, whose aim is to work for the furtherance of democracy, peace, and the rule of law in order to eliminate religious fundamentalism and terrorism from our global communities, with special emphasis on a community-based approach to countering extremism and political violence. It is chaired by Nigel Huddleston MP, with Lord Malcolm Bruce as its president.

Pak rule of Balochistan ‘an occupation’: Khan of Kalat

Ashis Ray in London

The present Khan of Kalat, Mir Suleman Khan Ahmedzai, whose ancestors once ruled much of Balochistan, is expected to tell a seminar in London on Thursday that Balochistan’s accession to Pakistan in 1948 was an “occupation of Balochistan”. He has informed organisers of the event that he will produce documents to substantiate his claim.

The seminar, entitled “Balochistan Re-visited”, will be held in a committee room of Britain’s House of Lords. It will reflect views of a spectrum of people from academics to Baloch nationalists.

Hyrbyair Marri, a Baloch nationalist and a former education minister in the Balochistan government, will emphasise “Britain did not honour its treaties” with Balochistan and that Pakistan “attacked” Balochistan.

Haider Baloch, a human rights activist, will deal with “human rights violations in Balochistan”. He believes it is now at “a critical juncture in the region’s history”.

Professor Sabir Badal Khan of Naples University is slated to speak on Britain’s arbitrary role in the merger of Balochistan with Pakistan. His opinion is that Britain took the Baloch part of the territory on lease from the government of Balochistan in Kalat and that they “were supposed to return it back to Balochistan before they left the region”.

In the months following the announcement on June 3, 1947, of India’s Partition Plan, the Kalat government made a series of moves, including holding talks with representatives of the Viceroy of India Lord Mountbatten and the future government of Pakistan in Delhi. These talks led to certain preparatory steps towards a formal re-affirmation of the suzerainty of the Khan of Kalat over the Balochistan.

One such meeting was held on August 4, 1947, in Delhi. It was chaired by Mountbatten and attended by his legal adviser Lord Ismay. Kalat State was represented by Khan of Kalat Ahmed Yar Khan and Prime Minister Sultan Ahmed. Mohammed Ali Jinnah and Liaquat Ali Khan represented Pakistan.

It resulted in the signing of a three-point agreement. Jinnah and Liaquat Ali signed for Pakistan and Ahmed for Kalat.

The agreement stated:

“1. Government of Pakistan recognises the independent and sovereign status of the state of Kalat, which has treaty relations with the British Government and whose status and position is different from the other princely states of India.

2. Legal opinion will be obtained to decide whether Pakistan can be the successor to those treaties and to the ones on leased areas.

3. After obtaining the legal opinion, there will be further talks between the representatives of Pakistan and Kalat. In the interim period, there shall be a standstill agreement between Pakistan and Kalat in relation to the areas under lease to the British Government.”

On August 12, 1947, Khan of Kalat formally proclaimed the independence of Kalat effective from August 15, 1947. On March 27, 1948, Khan of Kalat acceded to Pakistan under duress and in gross violation of the will of the people of Kalat-Balochistan as expressed unanimously by members of both Houses of Kalat parliament.


Article Source:: http://www.tribuneindia.com/news/world/pak-rule-of-balochistan-an-occupation–khan-of-kalat/368339.html

WAS BALOCHISTAN’S ACCESSION TO PAKISTAN LAWFUL?

On Thursday 23 February, a seminar hosted by The Democracy Forum will be held in a committee room of Britain’s House of Lords to discuss the hotly debated subject of Balochistan’s accession to Pakistan in 1948.

The seminar, entitled “Balochistan Re-visited”, will throw up views of a spectrum of people from academics to Baloch nationalists, not to mention the present Khan of Kalat, Mir Suleman Khan Ahmedzai, whose ancestors were once rulers of much of Balochistan.

Ahmedzai’s views will include what he describes as the “1948 occupation of Balochistan”. He has informed organisers of the seminar he will produce documentary evidence to present his case.

Hyrbyair Marri, a Baloch nationalist and a former education minister in the Balochistan government, will emphasise “Britain did not honour its treaties” with Balochistan and that Pakistan “attacked” Balochistan.

Haider Baloch, a human rights activists, will deal with “human rights violations in Balochistan”. He believes it is now at “a critical juncture in the region’s history”.

First Seminar of 2017: The history of Balochistan Revisited

The Democracy Forum’s first seminar of 2017, entitled ‘The history of Balochistan revisited’, will take place on Thursday 23 February 2017 from 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm at the House of Lords, London.

Chair:

  • Dr William Crawley, Senior Research Fellow, Institute of Commonwealth Studies

Speakers:

  • Professor Sabir Badal Khan, Dept of Asia, Africa and Mediterranean Studies, University of Oriental Studies, Naples
  • H H Mir Suleman Khan Ahmedzai, Khan of Kalat
  • Hyrbyair Marri, Baloch nationalist leader and former Education Minister, Balochistan
  • Haider K B Baloch, Advocate & human rights activist.

Venue:

Committee Room 4A, House of Lords Westminster, London SW1A 0PW


The seminar will examine the history of Balochistan in order to develop an understanding of the causes underlying the region’s current situation.